SEIU Healthcare Wisconsin in the Media

The public and the media want to hear about the experiences of health care workers at this time. Recent Media with SEIU Healthcare Wisconsin & supporters.

6/2/2020

Amid ongoing demonstrations in defense of Black lives across the country, SEIU Healthcare Wisconsin releases the following statement:

“We are a union made up of healthcare workers -Black, white, and brown- who are committed to providing care and working toward a healthier society for all. We join in solidarity with those expressing pain, anger, and outrage at the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tony McDade, David McAtee and countless other Black Lives.

The full statement can be read HERE.

5/15/2020

“This Nurses Week, instead of a supportive tweet or an empty proclamation honoring the work and sacrifices of nurses, we call on lawmakers to do something that nurses actually need. Pass legislation that prioritizes the health, safety and economic well-being of all working people.”

4/23/2020

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV-NBC)– Channel 15

 MADISON, Wis. (WISC-CBS)–Channel 3000

Take Action!

Healthcare workers need more than a “thank you”. To advocate too for covid Paid Sick Time, Hazard Pay, More PPE and health insurance! Support a Healthcare Heroes Act

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Ricardo Torres
April 22, 2020
“The way to help is not to put us all in danger with ill-considered protests, but for all of us to urge the Republican leadership to drop their request to the Wisconsin Supreme Court to block the governor’s order,” Margulis said. “But rather to bring the Legislature back to work to pass a relief bill that will help those that need it the most.”
“Mariah Clark, a nurse at University Hospital in Madison, said the recent protests “show no respect to those of us trying to keep Americans safe.”
“I’m not just talking about health care workers, I’m talking about all the essential workers that cannot stay home,”
Clark added she and other nurses have discussed with her family and colleagues about her last wishes if she was infected and became seriously ill. “These are the stakes for health care workers in this pandemic, it’s life and death,” Clark said.”
Wisconsin Examiner
Erik Gunn
April 23, 2020
Bonnie Margulis: “We are all deeply concerned about the economic impact this pandemic has wrought, particularly on those least able to withstand an economic shock,”
“Speakers called on the Legislature to abandon the GOP-led lawsuit and instead work to pass legislation guaranteeing hazard pay, personal protective equipment (PPE), paid sick leave and free medical coverage for treatment and prevention of COVID-19 for healthcare workers and other critical employees during the pandemic.”
WKOW
Caroline Bach
April 22, 2020
Up North News
Julian Emerson
April 22, 2020
“Mariah Clark, an emergency department nurse at UW Health System in Madison, is among medical personnel and others putting their lives on the line as they have contact with people infected with COVID-19. She criticized President Donald Trump for his support of the protesters seeking to lift stay-at-home orders across the country.
“It is appalling to see President Trump supporting these dangerous actions,” Clark said, likening his rhetoric to “reckless political stunts.” Clark also was critical of Trump’s failure to provide adequate funding for personal protective equipment necessary to protect nurses and other front line workers from infection. She said she and her coworkers lack protective equipment, often reusing masks for several days at a time…
At the state level, Clark called on the Republican-controlled Legislature to approve the Health Care Heroes Act that would provide funding for more PPE, fully paid sick leave and hazard pay, and health insurance for front line employees.”

CBS 58
Andy Devine
Apr 22, 2020

WPR
Laurel White
April 21, 2020

“Shari Signer, an inpatient nurse in Madison, spoke with reporters on the Tuesday call organized by Pocan’s office. She and her husband are both nurses….”I’m expected to wear the same mask from patient room to patient room, despite their isolation, despite their health care conditions,” she said. At the end of the day, she puts the mask in a brown paper bag to be re-worn the next day. “It is outrageous that health care workers continue to show up for a battle against a deadly virus without the protection, resources and support that we need to safely do our jobs,” she said.

Channel 3000
Staff
April 20, 2020
Ani Weaver, RN: “President Trump and Vice President Pence and all those that have treated this situation like a  political battleground, please put your differences aside and do what is truly right for both the economy AND the health of our community.”
WORT
Staff and Martin Rakacolli
April 21, 2020
Ani Weaver, RN: “I support the approach Governor Evers outlined Monday: A coordinated and science-based reopening of the economy as soon as we have sufficient testing infrastructure in place to ensure we can keep our communities healthy and safe. We need more testing supplies now. I think everyone can agree that we want to be able to reopen our economy. This just needs to be done safely and in a way that protects those of us on the front line who are already at risk. People are suffering, the pain is real, and that’s why we need our leaders to act.”
WPR
Shamane Mills
April 15, 2020
Quotes: Justin Byers, Kathy Hintz

“Kathy Hintz cleans rooms at an Appleton hospital. Not long ago, she said she cleaned her first room where a patient infected with the disease died. She said she lacked adequate protective gear and is monitoring herself for symptoms of COVID-19.
“Since the COVID-19 pandemic started I live on pins and needles,” said Hintz, who can’t babysit her grandchildren for fear of infecting them. “When I accepted this job as a housekeeper I didn’t ever think that it might mean I’d be signing my death certificate,” she said, bursting into tears during the teleconference.

Wisconsin Examiner
Erik Gunn
April 15, 2020
Quotes: Demetrica Shipp, Chip Stankovsky, Justin Byers, Randi Payne
“Joseph “Chip” Stankovsky, works in the food and nutrition department of a Milwaukee hospital and replenishes food stocks throughout the facility. One protective mask has to last him for the whole day or longer. Stankovsky recalled seeing his father’s pay stub in 1976 when he was 12 years old. His father made $12 an hour.
“I said ‘we’re rich!’ Now, 44 years later, I make the same amount,” he said. “Twelve dollars an hour was a living wage back in 1976,” Stankovsky continued. But in 2020, “$12 wasn’t enough before the COVID-19 pandemic, and it’s definitely not enough now.”
WKOW Channel 27
AJ Bayatpour
April 15, 2020
Quotes: Ryann Streicher, Justin Byers
 
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